Image Image Image Image Image
"Jonathan has photographed International Alert's work in three different continents. He always becomes part of the team, needs a minimum amount of support and delivers stunning images which convey a real sense of humanity."
Phil Vernon
Director of Programmes
International Alert
"Whether on a farm in East Africa, a Trawler in the Atlantic or a Royal Palace in London, Jonathan consistently delivers photography that makes us look good to our clients. "
Paul Campbell
Director of Purple Patch Group
"Quality photography is absolutely essential to our brand. It’s who we are, what we do and the impact we have on the world. And that means working with a photographer like Jonathan, who understands what we are trying to achieve with our work."
THOM MCKAY,
Director of Communications
RTKL.COM
"Jonathan has been a pleasure to work with, professional, well organised, creative and always delivering to the brief. Considering the breadth of topics we have asked him to work on around the world, he has also shown himself to be resourceful and flexible. "
Judith Batchelar,
Director of Sainsbury's Brand
"Jonathan has travelled to Intergen's power plants in Mexico, Australia and Europe and produces consistently high quality photography. Intergen's values are all about a high-quality work force for which we consider him part of. "
Mark Somerset,
Vice President
InterGen Europe
"Waiting on a quote from the British Red Cross "
Wendy Solesbury MBE
Youth Development Manager, British Red Cross
"We work with photographers that try to capture the essence of our work and reflect our company values in terms of design. Jonathan produces excellent results every time with creative flair. He is highly professional to work with as well as personable. "
Sean Collins & James Felstead
Directors of CGL Architects.
"Whether on a farm in East Africa, a Trawler in the Atlantic or a Royal Palace in London, Jonathan consistently delivers photography that makes us look good to our clients. "
Paul Campbell
Director of Purple Patch Group
"Jonathan has been a pleasure to work with, professional, well organised, creative and always delivering to the brief. Considering the breadth of topics we have asked him to work on around the world, he has also shown himself to be resourceful and flexible. "
Judith Batchelar,
Director of Sainsbury's Brand
"Waiting on a quote from the British Red Cross "
Wendy Solesbury MBE
Youth Development Manager, British Red Cross
"Jonathan Banks has captured the faces of different people that vividly represent the human side of the conflict of Nagorno-Karabakh where each individual remains above all a human being with his or her right to be what they are, wherever they live, with dignity and in peace. "
EU Ambassador in Yerevan
"Jonathan has travelled to Intergen's power plants in Mexico, Australia and Europe and produces consistently high quality photography. Intergen's values are all about a high-quality work force for which we consider him part of. "
Mark Somerset
Vice President, InterGen Europe
X

Architecture Archives - Photobanks

30

Nov

Mix interiors “Adobe” feature

  • By Jonathan Banks

Mix Interiors magazine’s November issue ran a feature on the award winning Adobe workplace project with a selection of my pictures.

Mix Interiors is the leading magazine for the commercial interiors market. Aimed at the architectural and design community each issue of Mix Interiors includes a number of detailed case studies.

The Adobe scheme has been designed by Gensler and Hoare Lea, and managed by Turner & Townsend and is a mixture of open plan areas, meeting rooms, social hubs, a library, tech cafe and games room. The creative work environment equally prioritises both individual and group space and equips employees with the technology they need to easily and efficiently collaborate. A major feature includes a ‘Customer Experience Centre’ – providing UK and European customers with an environment to experience Adobe’s technology. The office boasts cutting-edge connectivity and technology alongside bright and open areas where teams can meet and work together, as well as quieter spaces for individual work.

An interconnecting feature staircase constructed in bold, red perforated metal mesh around a steel structure that sits on a combination of concrete and timber platforms. Light cubes on wire mimic falling pixels spreading through the void space. The feature stair connects staff across levels 7 and 8 and reflects the industrial feel of the building. The overall aim was to create a feeling of home, not just a workspace that tells the story of the Adobe brand and culture.

To read the online case study -

http://www.mixinteriors.com/adobe/

06

Sep

Adobe’s creative cloud 9 offices in London

  • By Jonathan Banks

I recently photographed the new Adobe cutting edge office in London’s Shoreditch. The offices are located on the ‘Silicon Roundabout’ in London’s Tech City, a hive of innovation and the third-largest technology cluster in the world after San Francisco and New York City.

Adobe have taken 3 floors in the much talked about White Collar Factory development by Derwent London, one of London’s most innovative office specialist property regenerators. The building boasts high ceilings, abundant natural light and natural ventilation, thanks to concrete core cooling. And, as well as being a healthy place to work on the inside, there is plenty to do to keep fit and active with access to a roof terrace including a 150m running track and plenty of space to park bicycles.

The office will serve as Adobe’s new Sales & Marketing hub for London/Europe, and will house around 375 staff for the technology company. 

The scheme has been designed by Gensler and Hoare Lea and managed by Turner & Townsend and is a mixture of open plan areas, meeting rooms, social hubs, a library, tech café and a games room. A major feature includes a ‘Customer Experience Centre’ – providing UK and European customers with an environment to experience Adobe’s technology.

Como was assigned to complete the 45,000 sq ft fit out with features including an interconnecting feature staircase constructed in bold, red perforated metal mesh around a steel structure that sits on a combination of concrete and timber platforms. Light cubes on wire mimic falling pixels spreading through the void space. The feature stair connects staff across levels 7 and 8 and reflects the industrial feel of the building. The overall aim was to create a feeling of home, not just a workspace, which tells the story of the Adobe brand and culture.

The soffit is generally exposed with fabric baffles aiding acoustics and aesthetics, punctuated with areas of suspended metal mesh. The fabric baffling continues with meeting rooms and meeting pods, along with large AV arrangements.

This layout provides a fluid working environment, meant to spur new ideas and unexpected collaborations. The employees may have an assigned desk or access to quieter individual work spaces, but they’ll also have a variety of group spaces if they need to work in a collaborative way.

Of course, Adobe has included an element of their creative spirit, with an installation of coloured mirrors that reflects the iconic London skyline, mimicking Adobe Photoshop filters. Plus they have also commissioned local creativity, with an exclusive ceramic centrepiece designed by East London artist Zachary Eastwood-Bloom.

The offices have been seen as a confirmation of Adobe’s commitment to the UK and Europe, continuing their mission to inspire creativity in people who want to make a meaningful impact around the world.

 

Adobe-4767

18

May

Corporate photography is dead – long live corporate photography

  • By Jonathan Banks

Towards the end of last year I worked with DRAX Biomass at their Baton Rouge Port operation and the Morehouse Bioenergy pellet production fascility in Texas.

I was commissioned through Vismedia to photograph and capture the manufacturing process of compressed wood pellets from sustainable working forests in the U.S. south. These high density wood pellets are then used as a low carbon alternative to coal in the upgraded biomass units in their power station.

Corporate photography has changed drastically in recent times with more content being online. The annual report has been the traditional sales tool of companies, but it makes financial sense to capture images which become part of a larger media library for the client.

I have been photographing corporate photography for twenty years and have come to understand that value for money means exceptional photography delivering the companies ethos.

Corporate photography has to communicate a company’s business from the manufacturing, distribution and sales, through to the personality of the people that make that business. This is often highly diverse photography from a photojournalistic style, to portraits, studio, interior and architectural photography. The corporate photographer has to be technically competent in all fields of photography.

The knee jerk alternative for photography is to look towards stock agencies for imagery. Generic images of people working or communicating in a workspace that is not that of the companies can create doubt in the mind of the viewer and raise questions of professionalism. Commissioned, dynamic photography of a company’s activities and employees shows their individuality and personality.

A corporate photographer is not just someone who has an expensive camera who will record whatever they are shown. A corporate photographer works with the client prior to the shoot to determine what they want to capture and then will assist with the logistics of achieving this. The corporate photographer needs to understand a company’s business production so that they can come away with a set of pictures that invoke a clear strong statement about the company. Equally the photographs have to demand the attention of the viewer by catching the moment in an arresting manner. The photographs should be worthy of the many international corporate photography awards.

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

27

Apr

Interior Design – The Chicken or the Egg?

  • By Jonathan Banks

I have been photographing architecture and interiors in all sectors of the industry for 20 years.  I am privileged to enjoy a close working relationship with some incredible architects, designers and fit-out firms. I place a great deal of importance on discussing a project with the designer in advance of a shoot, understanding the design concept and the creative thinking behind an idea. I like to talk over the designer’s key features and the parameters that they had to work within. I believe that this gives me a better understanding of the space and contributes to me capturing the overall design.

Nando’s is working with a handful of talented designers producing some amazing interiors. I have photographed restaurants with features including 7000 beer bottles hung from the ceiling in a wave like instillation … intriguing use of materials such as a sculpted concrete bar … staircases made out of metal mesh and plywood … walls clad in everything from copper panels to wooden shingles but the new Nando’s restaurant in Oxford really did answer the question of “what came first the chicken or the egg”?

STAC Architecture designed the space around the simple concept of new beginnings and the egg. The restaurant has the yellow yoke centre with a Nando’s design pallete surrounding it. On the surface this design concept is a simple and affective idea but when you start looking at what the centre of the restaurant includes it is far from it.

Nando's 80 Cowley Street, Oxford OX4 1JB. 13 December 2016

Nando's 80 Cowley Street, Oxford OX4 1JB. 13 December 2016

Nando's 80 Cowley Street, Oxford OX4 1JB. 13 December 2016