Image Image Image Image Image
"Jonathan has photographed International Alert's work in three different continents. He always becomes part of the team, needs a minimum amount of support and delivers stunning images which convey a real sense of humanity."
Phil Vernon
Director of Programmes
International Alert
"Whether on a farm in East Africa, a Trawler in the Atlantic or a Royal Palace in London, Jonathan consistently delivers photography that makes us look good to our clients. "
Paul Campbell
Director of Purple Patch Group
"Quality photography is absolutely essential to our brand. It’s who we are, what we do and the impact we have on the world. And that means working with a photographer like Jonathan, who understands what we are trying to achieve with our work."
THOM MCKAY,
Director of Communications
RTKL.COM
"Jonathan has been a pleasure to work with, professional, well organised, creative and always delivering to the brief. Considering the breadth of topics we have asked him to work on around the world, he has also shown himself to be resourceful and flexible. "
Judith Batchelar,
Director of Sainsbury's Brand
"Jonathan has travelled to Intergen's power plants in Mexico, Australia and Europe and produces consistently high quality photography. Intergen's values are all about a high-quality work force for which we consider him part of. "
Mark Somerset,
Vice President
InterGen Europe
"Waiting on a quote from the British Red Cross "
Wendy Solesbury MBE
Youth Development Manager, British Red Cross
"We work with photographers that try to capture the essence of our work and reflect our company values in terms of design. Jonathan produces excellent results every time with creative flair. He is highly professional to work with as well as personable. "
Sean Collins & James Felstead
Directors of CGL Architects.
"Whether on a farm in East Africa, a Trawler in the Atlantic or a Royal Palace in London, Jonathan consistently delivers photography that makes us look good to our clients. "
Paul Campbell
Director of Purple Patch Group
"Jonathan has been a pleasure to work with, professional, well organised, creative and always delivering to the brief. Considering the breadth of topics we have asked him to work on around the world, he has also shown himself to be resourceful and flexible. "
Judith Batchelar,
Director of Sainsbury's Brand
"Waiting on a quote from the British Red Cross "
Wendy Solesbury MBE
Youth Development Manager, British Red Cross
"Jonathan Banks has captured the faces of different people that vividly represent the human side of the conflict of Nagorno-Karabakh where each individual remains above all a human being with his or her right to be what they are, wherever they live, with dignity and in peace. "
EU Ambassador in Yerevan
"Jonathan has travelled to Intergen's power plants in Mexico, Australia and Europe and produces consistently high quality photography. Intergen's values are all about a high-quality work force for which we consider him part of. "
Mark Somerset
Vice President, InterGen Europe
X

Technology Archives - Photobanks

30

Nov

Mix interiors “Adobe” feature

  • By Jonathan Banks

Mix Interiors magazine’s November issue ran a feature on the award winning Adobe workplace project with a selection of my pictures.

Mix Interiors is the leading magazine for the commercial interiors market. Aimed at the architectural and design community each issue of Mix Interiors includes a number of detailed case studies.

The Adobe scheme has been designed by Gensler and Hoare Lea, and managed by Turner & Townsend and is a mixture of open plan areas, meeting rooms, social hubs, a library, tech cafe and games room. The creative work environment equally prioritises both individual and group space and equips employees with the technology they need to easily and efficiently collaborate. A major feature includes a ‘Customer Experience Centre’ – providing UK and European customers with an environment to experience Adobe’s technology. The office boasts cutting-edge connectivity and technology alongside bright and open areas where teams can meet and work together, as well as quieter spaces for individual work.

An interconnecting feature staircase constructed in bold, red perforated metal mesh around a steel structure that sits on a combination of concrete and timber platforms. Light cubes on wire mimic falling pixels spreading through the void space. The feature stair connects staff across levels 7 and 8 and reflects the industrial feel of the building. The overall aim was to create a feeling of home, not just a workspace that tells the story of the Adobe brand and culture.

To read the online case study -

http://www.mixinteriors.com/adobe/

06

Sep

Adobe’s creative cloud 9 offices in London

  • By Jonathan Banks

I recently photographed the new Adobe cutting edge office in London’s Shoreditch. The offices are located on the ‘Silicon Roundabout’ in London’s Tech City, a hive of innovation and the third-largest technology cluster in the world after San Francisco and New York City.

Adobe have taken 3 floors in the much talked about White Collar Factory development by Derwent London, one of London’s most innovative office specialist property regenerators. The building boasts high ceilings, abundant natural light and natural ventilation, thanks to concrete core cooling. And, as well as being a healthy place to work on the inside, there is plenty to do to keep fit and active with access to a roof terrace including a 150m running track and plenty of space to park bicycles.

The office will serve as Adobe’s new Sales & Marketing hub for London/Europe, and will house around 375 staff for the technology company. 

The scheme has been designed by Gensler and Hoare Lea and managed by Turner & Townsend and is a mixture of open plan areas, meeting rooms, social hubs, a library, tech café and a games room. A major feature includes a ‘Customer Experience Centre’ – providing UK and European customers with an environment to experience Adobe’s technology.

Como was assigned to complete the 45,000 sq ft fit out with features including an interconnecting feature staircase constructed in bold, red perforated metal mesh around a steel structure that sits on a combination of concrete and timber platforms. Light cubes on wire mimic falling pixels spreading through the void space. The feature stair connects staff across levels 7 and 8 and reflects the industrial feel of the building. The overall aim was to create a feeling of home, not just a workspace, which tells the story of the Adobe brand and culture.

The soffit is generally exposed with fabric baffles aiding acoustics and aesthetics, punctuated with areas of suspended metal mesh. The fabric baffling continues with meeting rooms and meeting pods, along with large AV arrangements.

This layout provides a fluid working environment, meant to spur new ideas and unexpected collaborations. The employees may have an assigned desk or access to quieter individual work spaces, but they’ll also have a variety of group spaces if they need to work in a collaborative way.

Of course, Adobe has included an element of their creative spirit, with an installation of coloured mirrors that reflects the iconic London skyline, mimicking Adobe Photoshop filters. Plus they have also commissioned local creativity, with an exclusive ceramic centrepiece designed by East London artist Zachary Eastwood-Bloom.

The offices have been seen as a confirmation of Adobe’s commitment to the UK and Europe, continuing their mission to inspire creativity in people who want to make a meaningful impact around the world.

 

Adobe-4767

18

May

Corporate photography is dead – long live corporate photography

  • By Jonathan Banks

Towards the end of last year I worked with DRAX Biomass at their Baton Rouge Port operation and the Morehouse Bioenergy pellet production fascility in Texas.

I was commissioned through Vismedia to photograph and capture the manufacturing process of compressed wood pellets from sustainable working forests in the U.S. south. These high density wood pellets are then used as a low carbon alternative to coal in the upgraded biomass units in their power station.

Corporate photography has changed drastically in recent times with more content being online. The annual report has been the traditional sales tool of companies, but it makes financial sense to capture images which become part of a larger media library for the client.

I have been photographing corporate photography for twenty years and have come to understand that value for money means exceptional photography delivering the companies ethos.

Corporate photography has to communicate a company’s business from the manufacturing, distribution and sales, through to the personality of the people that make that business. This is often highly diverse photography from a photojournalistic style, to portraits, studio, interior and architectural photography. The corporate photographer has to be technically competent in all fields of photography.

The knee jerk alternative for photography is to look towards stock agencies for imagery. Generic images of people working or communicating in a workspace that is not that of the companies can create doubt in the mind of the viewer and raise questions of professionalism. Commissioned, dynamic photography of a company’s activities and employees shows their individuality and personality.

A corporate photographer is not just someone who has an expensive camera who will record whatever they are shown. A corporate photographer works with the client prior to the shoot to determine what they want to capture and then will assist with the logistics of achieving this. The corporate photographer needs to understand a company’s business production so that they can come away with a set of pictures that invoke a clear strong statement about the company. Equally the photographs have to demand the attention of the viewer by catching the moment in an arresting manner. The photographs should be worthy of the many international corporate photography awards.

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

DRAX Biomass, Morehouse BioEnergy in Bastrop and Baton Rouge port, October 2016

21

Mar

Microsoft sees the future of Coding with the visually impaired

  • By Jonathan Banks

I recently worked with the talented journalist, Allison Linn, on “Project Torino” in which Microsoft is creating a physical programming language for the visually impaired. I spent an afternoon with the design team plus, Lexy Ryan, aged 13, Theo Holroyd, aged 10 and Louisa Turtill, aged 9, and Khadijah Pinto Atkin, also aged 9 who have been using coding pods.

These days, most kids get their first introduction to coding through simplified tools that let them drag and drop blocks of commands, creating programs that can do things like navigate mazes or speed through space.

The Microsoft team have created what they are calling a physical programming language. It’s a way for kids to physically create code by connecting pods together to build programs.

The system, called Project Torino, is designed to make sure that kids who have visual impairments or other challenges can participate in coding classes along with all their classmates. But Cecily Morrison, one of the researchers working on the project, is hoping the system also will be appealing and useful for all learners, regardless of whether they have visual impairments or other challenges.

“One of our key design principles was inclusion. We didn’t want to isolate these kids again,” she said. “The idea was to create something that a whole mainstream class could use, and they could use together.”

The ultimate goal is even more ambitious: To get more kids with visual impairments and other challenges, such as dyslexia or autism, on the path to becoming software engineers and computer scientists.

“It’s clear that there’s a huge opportunity in professional computing jobs,” Morrison said. “This is a great career for a lot of kids who might have difficulty accessing other careers.”

A project like this can serve two goals: Technology companies say they are struggling with a “digital skills gap” that is leaving them without enough engineers and coders to meet their needs, and experts say it can be difficult for visually impaired people to find meaningful, accessible career paths.

The World Health Organization estimates that 285 million people worldwide are blind or visually impaired, and the vast majority of those people live in low-income settings. In the United Kingdom alone, the Royal National Institute of Blind People says only one in four working age adults who are blind or partially sighted are doing paid work.

Steve Tyler, head of solutions, strategy and planning for the Royal National Institute of Blind People, which is working with Morrison on the project, said coding has often been thought of as a promising career path for people with visual impairments. In recent years, however, computer science has come to rely much more on pictorial, graphical and conceptual coding methods, making it harder for kids with visual impairments to get exposed to the field.

Tyler said systems like Project Torino could help provide that path.

“This, for us, was a core reason for running with a project like this and supporting it,” Tyler said.

Tyler, who has a background in education, also said there is currently a woeful lack of resources for visually impaired children who have an interest in coding or more generally are ready for an introduction to mathematical and strategic thinking. That’s a huge problem because a child’s first introduction to these concepts can be a make or break moment for whether they end up being interested in pursuing a career in those types of fields.

Traditionally, Tyler said teachers have used chess to teach those kinds of strategic concepts to visually impaired children.

“I see this project a little bit like that,” he said. “It brings to life, in a 21st century way, that kind of ability to teach children these new concepts.”

The Microsoft team has spent the last year or so testing the system with a small group of about a dozen students. Nicolas Villar, a senior researcher in the UK lab who was instrumental in designing Project Torino, said one of the unexpected pleasures of the project is the opportunity to work with kids who have a very different way of experiencing the world.

For example, he said, the team originally made the pods all white, until the kids with limited vision told them that more colors would help them. And although in electronics there’s often a push to make things as small as possible, with this project they found the kids were more engaged when the pods were larger, in part because two kids working together would often both physically hold the pod and touch hands as part of that teamwork.

“We really honestly designed it with them. It was a collaboration,” Villar said of working with the group of kids. “We thought we were going to be doing something for them but we ended up designing with them.”

Now, they are working with RNIB to do an expanded beta trial of about 100 students. The researchers and the RNIB will be recruiting potential participants for the trial in mid-March at the VIEW conference for educators in the United Kingdom who work with visually impaired children.

For now, the beta is focused only on the UK, which has spearheaded a massive effort to get more kids interesting in coding. Eventually, they hope to make it more broadly available to teachers and students outside of the UK.

A lesson in computational thinking
Project Torino is geared toward kids age 7 to 11. Using the coding tools, students can do things like make songs, even incorporating silly noises, poetry and sounds they create themselves.

As they build their code, Morrison said they learn the kind of programming concepts that will lead to careers in computer science or related fields.

“It is very specifically about building up concepts that will enable them to become computer scientists, programmers, software engineers, computational thinkers,” she said. “It gives them that computational base to whatever direction they go, and a shared vocabulary about what computing is.”

Morrison and her colleagues also have created a curriculum for teachers who want to use Project Torino. She said the teachers do not need to have a computer science background to use the curriculum – in fact, they assume that most teachers will not have any expertise in coding.

The system also is designed to grow with kids. Once they have mastered the physical programming language, Morrison said they also have created an app that allows kids to transfer the coding they have done with the physical system into text-based code, and then use other assistive technologies to continue coding.

“We’re mapping a pathway from the physical to something that a professional software engineer could use,” she said.

microsoft-5201

microsoft-5219

microsoft-5233

microsoft-5357

microsoft-5456

microsoft-5792